The Curious Case of Paul Gilley

It sounds like a “Who’s buried in Grant’s Tomb?” line:  Who wrote Hank Williams’ greatest songs? Paul Gilley The obvious answer is that Hank Williams did.  However, there are a small number of people who, quite sincerely, believe that—at least in the case of “I’m So Lonesome I Could Cry” (1949) and “Cold, Cold Heart” … Continue reading The Curious Case of Paul Gilley

Turning Our Backs on Irony Man

Like many people well into middle age, I’ve felt increasingly out of sync with the modern world in recent years.  The things I value most seem to be less appreciated in the 21st century, while the values of the new century seem foreign to me. It’s impossible to tell what posterity will make of the … Continue reading Turning Our Backs on Irony Man

Your Cheatin’ Heart: A Hank Williams We Never Knew

Having seen the new Hank Williams biopic I Saw the Light recently and written a blog post about it, I thought that this would be a good occasion to revisit the most prominent of the previous tellings of Williams’ story, Gene Nelson’s Your Cheatin’ Heart (1964).  That’s the one which features George Hamilton as Williams, … Continue reading Your Cheatin’ Heart: A Hank Williams We Never Knew

I Saw the Light: Hank Williams on His Way Downhill

  If your interests are anything like mine—and if they aren’t, you’re reading the wrong blog—you wouldn’t dream of missing the new film I Saw the Light.  It’s a feature film about Hank Williams, with a big budget and some big-name actors.  Where do I get tickets? As to the movie itself, you’ve probably got … Continue reading I Saw the Light: Hank Williams on His Way Downhill

Hank Williams’ Apostrophe: A Quest for Authenticity

The title of the song is “Your Cheatin’ Heart.” That much is clear. It’s right there on the cover of the sheet music, as published by Williams’ own publisher, Acuff-Rose, in 1952. Of that there is no possible doubt whatever. Thereafter, though, things get murky. It seems obvious that, if you’re singing the song, the … Continue reading Hank Williams’ Apostrophe: A Quest for Authenticity